Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Making Homemade Chicken Broth






So many of our recipes these days call for chicken broth. I prefer to make my own and freeze it for future use, rather than using the canned variety. I usually make a big batch of it and freeze it in plastic ice cube trays leftover from the days when we needed them. I can then use one convenient cube at a time, to make soup or other dishes calling for chicken broth. If I need extra ice cube trays, I can get them from Amazon, along with a Dutch Oven, and a Fat Skimmer.

More Flavorful Broth

Why would you want homemade? The primary reason is the flavor is much better than the canned variety. Not only that, but YOU control the amount of salt and seasonings that go into the making. For me that's a win-win situation, since I've cut down on my salt intake over the past few years.

Economical Use For Extra Chicken Parts.

Make the most of those pieces of chicken that most people don't eat. Use the boney pieces like backs, necks and wings to make your chicken go farther. This recipe starts with 2 pounds of those parts and makes 8 cups of broth. If you want to make a larger batch, save the parts from several chickens, and double the ingredients. When frozen, each cube will measure approximately 1/4 cup, depending on the size of your ice cube trays.


Ingredients

    2 pounds chicken backs, necks and/or wings
    8 cups water
    2 onions, quartered
    1 cup coarsely chopped celery, including leaves
    1/2 cup sliced carrots
    2 teaspoons chopped fresh parsley
    1 and 1/2 teaspoons salt (I use Kosher salt; lower sodium)
    1/4 teaspoon pepper
    1 Bay leaf

Instructions

    In a large (5-quart) Dutch oven, combine chicken and water.
    Bring to a boil.
    Reduce heat; simmer partially covered for 30 minutes.
    Skim scum from surface.
    Add remaining ingredients except 1/2 teaspoon salt; and simmer on low, partially covered for 4 hours.
    Remove bones; strain.
    Stir in remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt.
    Cool uncovered in refrigerator.
    Skim fat from the top of broth after cooling.
    Pour broth into ice cube trays and freeze.
    Once they're frozen, pop them out and put into freezer bags and refreeze.

When your recipe calls for chicken broth, remember that each cube measures about 1/4 cup of broth. Just pop in however much your recipe calls for.